Walking / Hiking

First Parish Church Sanctuary and Burying Ground

Both the historic Sanctuary and Burying Ground of First Parish Church of Newbury, 20 High Road, will be open, with guides to provide information and answer any questions. Gathered in 1635, First Parish is the oldest, "mother church", in the Newburyport area and many of the original settlers and their descendants are buried in the Burying Ground, including Henry Sewall, Tristram Coffin and his wife Judith, and the Reverend John Tucker. Come visit our historic sites - there will be a scavenger hunt in the Burying Ground!

The Creation of the Common and the Old Center

If you thought that the North Andover Common dates back to colonial times, you are not alone! Join us for the true story behind this iconic feature of the town's landscape, starting with our current exhibit and followed by a walking tour to explore the changes in the Old Center from 1825 until today. You will have a better appreciation for the work of the North Andover Improvement Society and other area personalities who took a dusty, forgotten crossroads village and made it a pleasant and quaint colonial revival Center.

C.W. ‘Tryout’ Smith Commemoration and Headstone Dedication

An earlier pioneer of the amateur journalism movement, Charles. W. “Tryout” Smith, is being honored in September with a ceremony capped by the placement of a headstone at his relatively obscure Haverhill gravesite. Smith began publishing the Monthly Visitor from his Haverhill home in 1888, mostly to help his brother Frank raise money after his brother became too ill to work. The Smiths turned out 118 issues, ending a decade later.

AnnTiques' Exhibit of Art Glass and Jewelry and Furnishings

AnnTiques presents a colorful antique, midcentury and vintage art glass and colorful crystal and art glass jewelry exhibit in support of the 2017 Trails & Sails events in Ipswich. Please join us as AnnTiques welcomes you to travel through time in their eclectic curated global emporium of mid-century modern, vintage and antique furniture, lighting, jewelry, art, textiles, rugs, pottery, art glass, Native American selections, vintage music and ephemera collections.

Folk Art Show Featuring Artist Johanne Cassia

Enjoy visiting Ipswich, America's first period town, to view a historic American folk art show featuring folk artist, JOHANNE CASSIA at Hall Haskell House Visitor Center Gallery! This art show is open FREE to the public. The Hall Haskell House historic site gallery is a wonderful place to view art reflecting early American history. Johanne Cassia, american folk artist, is one of a small number of artists painting in 17th and 18th century style. Johanne is an accomplished artist who creates early village scenes, maritime seascapes, and landscapes.

Welcome to White Court

Come join the Town of Swampscott for a celebration of the historical, cultural, and natural wonder of Swampscott’s iconic White Court (Calvin Coolidge’s Summer White House). Visitors will be able to enjoy memorabilia from President Coolidge’s family as well as stories of his presidency. Visitors can also view cars from the 1920s, take part in programming and fun activities for kids, as well as music and light refreshments.

Punto Urban Art Museum Official Tour

Our vision is to create a world class urban arts district in Salem’s Point Neighborhood, one that embraces its rich immigrant and architectural history and present a dynamic opportunity for the neighborhood’s future. The Punto Urban Art Museum has two primary goals: to create a beautiful, uplifting environment for Point residents, particularly for children to grow up in, and to break down the invisible divide between the Point and the rest of Salem by inviting visitors into the Point to experience world-class art first-hand. Please join us for an informative walking tour around the Point

North River Walk & Talk—Ecology, History and the Future

Once called the Blue Danube of Salem, the ecologically important tidal North River provides the largest source of fresh water to Salem Sound. Originally lovely and wide, flowing through forests and meadows, the river was transformed by both the industrial revolution and urban development. Polluting tanneries lined the banks. The railroad came along and narrowed the banks with fill. Land pressures from urban development brought more fill and channelization of the river.

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